Begun in 2008, it's unlikely that I'll regularly make entries to this blog, so do check my main site at www.fourhares.com

This blog is more likely to include posts of a political nature - and one that requires sisu on the part of many!

Archives dated prior to March 2008 are entries moved across from either LiveJournal or Octant.

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Serendipitous reflections

It’s a joy when I haphazardly stumble across an old friend or acquaintance that I have not seen or heard from in years (or decades) and see their success and life directions. Recently, through a series of internet clicks, perusing for a possible firm to engage for marketing Little Yarra, emerged a person who is now managing director of a major (overseas) branch of one of the firms I perused.

The internet certainly makes privacy a little fragile – and at the same time brings the world closer. Here was, in this instance, someone whom I have not seen since the 1970s – a bright and promising life met when I lived and worked in London. I recall their move to Paris at around the same time I had already moved there (though we never again met), and our common appreciation of refinements such as Bang & Olufsen.

For myself, this was doubly serendipitous in that I have of late had London more on my mind as my wife and I talk of our connections to the city, both in terms of our visits, as well as on the imminent birth of her first grand-child…

Australian National Curriculum Review

I have (finally) added a page with a copy of my late-night submission to the review of the so-called Australian National Curriculum. I say ‘so-called’, as there is, of course, no such thing, nor should there be!

For ease of reference, the page is on my main fourhares site: Australian National Curriculum Review (a pdf version is also available).

A most astounding pen...

I must admit that I find many pens a little lacking – but this one has all the qualities that I would rejoice in using: the Pelikan M101N Jubilee Pen… otherwise referred to as the lizard pattern.

Two US-based conferences...

Here are two conferences to which, each year, I look to and, as usual, am unable to participate… this year precisely a month apart.

Semiotic Society of America

The annual conference of the Semiotic Society of America taking place, this year, in Seattle between the 2nd and 5th of October:

Semiotic Society of America Seattle conference 2014

RunRev’s LiveCode 2014

The other is (also an annual) conference, this year taking place in San Diego between the 2nd and the 5th of September, from RunRev for LiveCode:

RunRev's Live 2014 Conference in San Diego

…ah well – perhaps in 2015!

On the hope of the incoming Federal Senate

It’s been a long time coming, but there appears to be some light at the end of the tunnel – a long tunnel made all the darker during the last few years with the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd government. That they managed to not only erode personal freedoms and expand government bureaucracies to the extent they did shows how easily Germany in the 1930s moved to the extreme (and voted-in) Nazi regime. The Abbott government will have a tough time undoing the damage put in place.

However, there is a glimmer of hope: with the election of representatives from the Liberal Democrats, Family First and the Palmer United Party, it is very likely that liberal principles may be at play in passing legislation.

I am here reminded of the foreword by Thomas J. DiLorenzo to Two Essays by Ludwig von Mises: ‘Liberty and Property’ and ‘Middle-of-the-Road Policy Leads to Socialism’:

Government regulation was extensive enough in 1958, when Mises wrote “Liberty and Property,” but the virtual explosion of regulation since that time underscores another reason why private property is important to free speech. Namely, the more regulated individuals and businesses become, the less likely that they will criticize the government for fear of regulatory retribution. Private property and free markets are prerequisites for genuinely free speech.

We are unfortunately increasingly seeing signs of this. Witness, for instance, the silencing of teachers and principals who have dared to voice their view on NAPLAN; or the (justifiable) concern over criticisms against government bureaucracies that hold power over registration or funding of either individual teachers or schools.

There is genuine hope that with the forthcoming Senate, some alterations may be at hand… but then again, in Victoria, when the Liberals came into power, they did but little (even though they could have) to redress Labor’s bureaucratic establishments of the VIT and the VRQA. Perhaps it will require not so much the support of the Liberal Democrats and other parties, but the insistence from these so-called ‘micro-‘parties!

forecasting the new Pope

There will no doubt be numerous conflicting predictions as to who is likely to be elected our next Pope. Back prior to the election of Benedict XVI, I forecast the wrong individual (I thought he did not have much of a chance) but correctly predicted the name he was to adopt (Benedict).

Papal name

Of the names the new Pope will adopt (and of course there are infinite possibilities), it’s likely that some new name will be used. Something of ‘Clement’ is likely to be incorporated (‘Chana’ in Hebrew), and yet the two that appear to give the kind of impetus needed combine ‘John’ and ‘Maria’. Given that ‘Maria’ is an accepted masculine name (especially when the second part of an hyphenated name or middle name), and that ‘John’ in Hebrew includes within ‘Jochanan’ the sounds (though not exact spelling) of ‘Clement’, I am really putting myself out and suggest that the following new Papal name will be chosen:

PP John-Maria [Ioannes Maria PP]

Papal person

Now as to whom…

Again, it should be recalled that the electoral conclave, comprising of Cardinals under the age of 85, may elect, by a clear 2/3 majority (this is now again the case given some of the minor changes brought into effect by PP Benedict XVI), any catholic man (a woman cannot be elected as currently no woman may be made a bishop in the Catholic Church, and the elect becomes, as Pope, Bishop of Rome).

Still, it’s highly unlikely that a person outside the Conclave would be selected. The only such likely candidate would be someone of the likes of Laurence Freeman – a move away from someone like PP Benedict XVI who, though an outstanding theologian with also a deep engaged praxis, has not ‘reached’ the incredible surge and call to the spiritual life that is ripe.

So if it is someone chosen that, though requiring also a solid administrative capability is also someone that seeks for ways to bring Christ to those who hunger for the spirit, there is one outstanding Cardinal in the mix:

Cardinal Péter Erdő

Coat of Arms

As an interesting side-note, it is only after putting the above together that I looked at Péter Erdõ’s coat of arms. What is of significance here is that it makes the inclusion of ‘Maria’ in an adopted Papal name all the more sensible:

Cardinal Péter Erdő

It ain't no Arab 'spring'!

I’ve been rather astounded and amazed that the media has consistently referred to the revolutionary events in various Arabic countries as an ‘Arab spring’. If we look at the consequences of these events and the shifting powers that have resulted, it would be equivalent of having called the Bolshevik, Maoist, and Nazi revolutionary shifts as, respectively, Russian, Chinese, and German (and Austrian) ‘springs’.

Of course a move towards democracy is to be commended, but democracy itself is not what is intrinsically of highest political value. Rather, what is of high merit and value is individual personal autonomy and freedom: when these are taken away, whether through a democratic or an autocratic regime, there is something amiss.

Celebrating the revolutionary changes in the various Arabic speaking lands is akin to celebrating those disastrous changes that occurred in those three areas previously mentioned in the early parts of the 20th century. If we simply take a look at the changes that are taking place in the respective countries in which the Arab revolutionary forces have been successful, what is evident is that what is taking place is more akin to the revolutionary changes that took place in Iran with the fall of the Shah in the late 1970s.

Until, and unless, there is a deep sense that someone, irrespective of their birth, can legitimately renounce the negative forces inherent in communism, islam, or fascism, the Arabic landscape will not be able to have its deserved ‘Spring’. Surely 1400 years of Autumn and Winter is enough!

Truth, Beauty and the Good

'Meet Tarek Fatah'

ideacity on livestream.com. Broadcast Live Free

Reading the Marseille Tarot

It’s way overdue, and the files on my computer have finally made it to printers (at this stage available only from Lulu.com).

This is a tarot book that I originally wrote over the course of a year spanning across 2007-2008, and the isbn is registered as 2009. Since then, the most I have done is revise a sentence here and there.

As I mention in the foreword, without Jean-Claude and Roxanne Flornoy re-creating the Jean Noblet tarot from semi-oblivion, I would not have had a deck with the depth this one brings to unveil the connections as I would fully like to. What a loss Jean-Claude’s death from a week and a half ago is to the tarot world – let alone the loss to his friends, family and acquaintances! I do thank him for the gifts he has left us!

To obtain the book… simply on the image below:

> Reading the Marseille Tarot

jmd - JM David - Reading the Marseille Tarot